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Archival description
McGill University Archives
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Cyrus John MacMillan Fonds

  • CA MUA MG 1057
  • Fonds
  • 1904-1953

Fonds consists of correspondence and literary manuscripts, documenting all aspects of MacMillan’s career. Biographical background is provided by his own notes on his life and family history. From his student years come certificates and testimonials in support of his application for a Rhodes Scholarship (1904-1909). His war experience is recorded in letters from the front preserved by his family, and by a personal diary for 1917. There are also approximately twenty photographs of Macmillan and his family taken between about 1905 and 1940.

Macmillan's correspondence includes files of letters to his wife (1917-1936) on his war service and political affairs; personal and social letters (1923-1929); political correspondence, including several letters from McKenzie King (1926-1946); letters concerning McGill, including a number from Sir Arthur Currie and from Stephen Leacock (1920-1947); post-retirement correspondence on McGill and public affairs; and correspondence concerning his publications (1920-1960). There are also files of invitations to events at McGill and elsewhere.

The manuscripts fall into two categories: political speeches and literary manuscripts. Besides notes and texts for his own speeches, there are also texts of, and newspaper clippings about speeches written by Macmillan for Sir Arthur Currie and others (1920-1950). Drafts and typescripts of his literary works are supplemented by notes, clippings and correspondence.

MacMillan, Cyrus, 1880-1953

Ramsay Traquair fonds

  • CA MUA MG 3089
  • Fonds
  • approximately 1911-1940

Traquair's papers largely concern his work as a lecturer. School of Architecture lectures in architectural history cover the classical, mediaeval and modern periods (ca 1935-1936), while those on architectural ornament are largely devoted to lettering. Miscellaneous lectures, about 30 in number, were delivered between about 1924 and 1937 to various audiences, such as school children, extension students and members of art and architectural associations. They deal with architectural history, architectural principles both aesthetic and social, and other art forms (painting, carpets, heraldry etc.)

Material relating to Traquair's publications includes drafts of about 15 articles on many of the same topics as the lectures described above, and stemming from the same period. A special series of notes and manuscripts, together with some correspondence, illustrates Traquair's research on Québec arts.

Traquair, Ramsay, 1874-1952

Clement Henry McLeod Fonds

  • CA MUA MG1056
  • Fonds
  • 1868-1968

Very few of the McLeod papers actually concern the Observatory. However, his work for the railways and in Newfoundland is documented, as are his views on the education and employment of engineers. The basic record for the early part of his career is a diary kept from 1870 to 1875, regarding student days and early work on the Observatory. An essay, "Winter under canvas" (1868) describes an early surveying job, and a letter from his father (1872) inquires about his academic progress. His work for the railways is documented by three letters of recommendation, and two letters (one from Stanford Fleming) on the work of his colleagues in the West. The Newfoundland survey (1875) is described in McLeod's diary, a manuscript essay "Across Newfoundland" (1876), his printed reports and three letters. His work at McGill is represented by six letters (largely official acknowledgements of appointments), and McLeod's manuscript notes on McGill history. McLeod's concern with the engineering profession is reflected in two addresses on education and professional development, and copies of about a dozen letters to Sir Wilfrid Laurier (1906-1908), C.A. McGrath and E.F. Wurtele (1912), largely on the employment of engineers in the civil service.

McLeod, Clement Henry, 1851-1917

Joseph Gould Fonds

  • CA MUA MG2063
  • Fonds
  • 1856-1860

Gould's papers fall into two series. Family correspondence covers the years 1856 to 1860, when Joseph and his brother Charles were travelling in Europe, and consists of letters home from both young men, and their parents' replies. Manuscript music comprises two volumes of church anthems, with some organ music; some are original compositions by Gould and Samuel Warren. Related to this is Gould's brief manuscript account of the origin of the Mendelssohn Choir. Some family photographs are also included.

Gould, Joseph, 1833-1913

Frank Dawson Adams Fonds

  • CA MUA MG1014
  • Fonds
  • 1896-1941

Adams' papers are largely concerned with his experiments on the mechanical deformation of rocks. Glass lantern slides, both for lectures and private record, are also included, as well as some materials on his interest in religion and in the history of geology. His scientific research is documented by working papers and experimental materials on rock deformation, 1896-1912. These consist of ten notebooks and one scrapbook recording his experiments, as well as notes, photographs, and carbons of typescript chapters on background literature, equipment used, and specific minerals. There are also graphs recording results, and over 1,000 photographs, glass negatives, and petrographic microscope slides. Adams' index-card bibliography lists articles and reports on Canadian geology and mining (ca 1900-1920). Adams' collection of glass slides and negatives were used for teaching geology and as a private record of his travels and family life. These slides number approximately 1,000, and show mines (particularly in Canada) volcanoes and glaciers, a large collection of views of Mexico, the Laurentians, China, the Rockies, England and Palestine, as well as family and vacation scenes. Also included are two essays, and an outline for a third on the Christian life (1937), short reflexions on his activities from 1937 to 1942, a photocopy of his will (1943), clippings of articles where he is mentioned (1919-1942), and notices of his history of Christ Church Cathedral (1941). Adams' interest in the history of geology is reflected in a manuscript biography of A.R.C. Selwyn, for the centenary of the Geological Society of Edinburgh, and a handful of letters and notes on the early use of the word "geology" (1932). His post-retirement travels resulted in a manuscript essay on mining in Malaya.

Adams, Frank Dawson, 1859-1942

Gilbert Prout Girdwood Fonds

  • CA MUA MG1081
  • Fonds
  • 1814-1915

The bulk of Girdwood's papers concern his work in forensic medicine. Other materials cover his research in photography, and his general medical and scientific interests. Girdwood's career as medical-legal consultant is documented by 24 cm of his notes and reports, together with some correspondence, on four poisoning trials: People vs Emma Davis (Malone, N.Y., 1881), Queen vs Provencher and Boisclair (Sorel, 1867), Queen vs Joseph Ruel (St. Hyacinthe, 1868), and Queen vs David Prevost and Damase Brunet (L'Orignal, 1881). There are also coroner's autopsy reports and notes for four cases; Girdwood's memoires of ten cases on which he served as consultant; Rogers and Girdwood's submission to the Home Office, London, on the strychnine test, together with letters to Lancet and the Times on the same subject; and notes on the counterfeiting of stamps (1893). His interest in medical photography is reflected in lists of X-rays taken by him (1898-1899) and reprints of three articles. His general scientific and medical activities are represented by a scrapbook of newsclippings on cholera (1854), a lecture on gold presented to the Natural History Society of Montréal (n.d.), essays on strychnine (1864) and water filtration (1869), a review of a textbook in physiology (1864) and some reprints, including convocation addresses to the Medical Faculty. Finally, there is a manuscript copy of an address to the graduating class of Applied Science in 1881 and a small scrapbook of printed articles by Girdwood's father, G.F. Girdwood, M.D.

Girdwood, Gilbert Prout, 1832-1917

James Bell Fonds

  • CA MUA MG2025
  • Fonds
  • 1885-1911

This material features a small amount of medical papers: a manuscript of Bell's address on the subject of nursing training to the Alumnae Association of the R.V.H. School for Nurses, 1910; a letter introducing Bell to Dr. Viktor Hueter of Marburg, Germany, from Francis Shepherd, 1891; and a laboratory report to Bell from R.F. Ruttan, on kidney stones, 1900. Bell's map of the Riel Rebellion, 1885, is also included. A series of five lectures and papers on intestinal ailments, syphilis, rodent ulcer of the face, cancer of the larynx and kidney disease is supplemented by 19 case reports, 1896-1907, 7 of patients whose primary symptom was abdominal pain, and 12 suffering from sore or swollen throat. The remainder of the papers consist almost entirely of obituary notices, newsclippings and resolutions in memory of Bell and about half a dozen lettes of sympathy, including one from Sir William Osler.

Bell, James, 1852-1911

Thomas Patton Gladstone Shaw Fonds

  • CA MUA MG2035
  • Fonds
  • 1914-1929

Apart from student laboratory notes in physics, 1919, Shaw's papers consist of printed and mimeographed reports on a miscellaneous group of chemical topics, but with a significant percentage on ethylene, propylene, acetylene and ethers, together with some of Shaw's manuscript notes and charts. Also included is his report to Canadian Electro Products on acetaldol formation.

Shaw, T. P. G. (Thomas Patton Gladstone), 1898-1976

Thomas Sterry Hunt Fonds

  • CA MUA MG2045
  • Fonds
  • 1845-1891

The bulk of the Hunt papers consists of scientific correspondence, with a fairly large component of notes on scientific subjects. Most of the material dates from after Hunt's departure for the United States. With the exception of a letter of appointment to the Geological Survey of Vermont in 1845, all Hunt's correspondence (incoming, with copies of some outgoing) dates from the period 1863-1891, with the majority of items from the 1880s. There are a few letters of a social or personal nature, but most concern scientific matters: geological and chemical research problems, exchange of specimens, Hunt's theories and the controversies they stirred, his publications, negotiations for patents on some of his discoveries, the business of various scientific societies, and in particular the organization of the Geological Congress. Amongst his correspondents were James D. Dana (with whom he engaged in a heated quarrel over scientific theory), James Hall, Persifor Frazer, J.W. Dawson, and various members of the Geological Survey of Canada, such as G.M. Dawson, Robert Bell, Henry Y. Hind, and George Iles. Hunt's scientific notes mostly deal with special topics in chemistry, geology, mineralogy, railways, coal products and the controversy with Dana. There are also reading notes for geological texts, lecture notes for courses in geology, 1876, and chemistry, and indexes, apparently for Hunt's books. A manuscript on "Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography: an episode in its history", notes for a lecture on "People I have met", and sketches of family history represent Hunt's wider interests. There are also clippings of reviews of books and lectures by Hunt, biographical notices, reports on scientific themes and institutions, and news of the Geological Survey.

Hunt, Thomas Sterry, 1826-1892

William Edmond Logan Fonds

  • CA MUA MG2046
  • Fonds
  • 1772-1884

Virtually all the Logan papers concern his scientific work. A small percentage relates to the affairs of his family, and to memorials to Logan after his death. The great majority of the papers consists of scientific correspondence from about 1820 to 1874, but mostly for the years following his appointment to the Survey in 1842. The letters deal with the collection, exchange and description of geological specimens, expeditions under the aegis of the survey, problems of research and scientific interpretation, scientific meetings, and visits by scientists. The number of correspondents, both individuals and learned societies, is very large, but the most substantial bodies of letters are from J.W. Dawson, geologist and Principal of McGill University, James Hall, palaeontologist of the New York Geological Survey, Alexander Murray, Logan's chief assistant, and James Lowe of Grenville, Québec, who supplied Logan with specimens and appears to have been casually employed by him on surveying jobs and field trips. Other correspondents include Sanford Fleming, E.D. Ashe of the Québec Observatory, Thomas Sterry Hunt, and R.I. Murchison of the Geographical Society of Great Britain. Some letters pertain to political or social affairs, but usually in close connection with the scientific work of Logan or the Survey. These files contain copies of some of Logan's outgoing letters, as well as some letters addressed to other individuals, generally his assistants. Other scientific papers consist of field trip records (a journal kept during an expedition in 1845, a weather table kept on Lake Superior in the winter of 1846-1847, work records and astronomical readings for surveying projects, notes on mineral deposits, and lists of specimens), manuscripts of three scientific papers, as well as "Observations on the proposed Geological Survey", and manuscript and printed maps and geological schemata, including some by Logan of the Bay of Fundy, Labrador, and Hamilton, Ontario regions. Manuscript catalogues of specimens were prepared by Logan for the Paris Exhibitions of 1855 and 1867. Official reports include Logan's annual reports for 1842-1844, an overview of the work of the Geological Survey, 1866, two reports by Logan on prospects for mining on the north shore of Lake Superior, 1846, 1847, and one on mineral deposits around Rivière du Loup, 1853, as well as Logan's copy of his proposed Geological Survey Bill, 1844, and some copies of reports on mining and cartography prepared by others. Logan's financial records include expense accounts for Geological Survey expeditions, as well as other professional expenditures, such as books. His private and family life is reflected by a very brief diary of an Atlantic crossing in 1856, letters to and from his brothers James and Henry, his father, his uncle Hart Logan, and Hart Logan's partner John Fleming, covering the years 1772-1856. There are also baptismal and burial certificates, and legal documents, particularly bills of sale pertaining to James Logan's farm. Memorials to Logan after his death include J.W. Dawson's correspondence concerning the Logan Memorial Fund and Collection, 1881, and a manuscript biography by Alexander Murray. There is a chronological and author/recipient index to these papers.

Logan, William E. (William Edmond), Sir, 1798-1875

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