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William Edmond Logan Fonds

  • CA MUA MG2046
  • Fonds
  • 1772-1884

Virtually all the Logan papers concern his scientific work. A small percentage relates to the affairs of his family, and to memorials to Logan after his death. The great majority of the papers consists of scientific correspondence from about 1820 to 1874, but mostly for the years following his appointment to the Survey in 1842. The letters deal with the collection, exchange and description of geological specimens, expeditions under the aegis of the survey, problems of research and scientific interpretation, scientific meetings, and visits by scientists. The number of correspondents, both individuals and learned societies, is very large, but the most substantial bodies of letters are from J.W. Dawson, geologist and Principal of McGill University, James Hall, palaeontologist of the New York Geological Survey, Alexander Murray, Logan's chief assistant, and James Lowe of Grenville, Québec, who supplied Logan with specimens and appears to have been casually employed by him on surveying jobs and field trips. Other correspondents include Sanford Fleming, E.D. Ashe of the Québec Observatory, Thomas Sterry Hunt, and R.I. Murchison of the Geographical Society of Great Britain. Some letters pertain to political or social affairs, but usually in close connection with the scientific work of Logan or the Survey. These files contain copies of some of Logan's outgoing letters, as well as some letters addressed to other individuals, generally his assistants. Other scientific papers consist of field trip records (a journal kept during an expedition in 1845, a weather table kept on Lake Superior in the winter of 1846-1847, work records and astronomical readings for surveying projects, notes on mineral deposits, and lists of specimens), manuscripts of three scientific papers, as well as "Observations on the proposed Geological Survey", and manuscript and printed maps and geological schemata, including some by Logan of the Bay of Fundy, Labrador, and Hamilton, Ontario regions. Manuscript catalogues of specimens were prepared by Logan for the Paris Exhibitions of 1855 and 1867. Official reports include Logan's annual reports for 1842-1844, an overview of the work of the Geological Survey, 1866, two reports by Logan on prospects for mining on the north shore of Lake Superior, 1846, 1847, and one on mineral deposits around Rivière du Loup, 1853, as well as Logan's copy of his proposed Geological Survey Bill, 1844, and some copies of reports on mining and cartography prepared by others. Logan's financial records include expense accounts for Geological Survey expeditions, as well as other professional expenditures, such as books. His private and family life is reflected by a very brief diary of an Atlantic crossing in 1856, letters to and from his brothers James and Henry, his father, his uncle Hart Logan, and Hart Logan's partner John Fleming, covering the years 1772-1856. There are also baptismal and burial certificates, and legal documents, particularly bills of sale pertaining to James Logan's farm. Memorials to Logan after his death include J.W. Dawson's correspondence concerning the Logan Memorial Fund and Collection, 1881, and a manuscript biography by Alexander Murray. There is a chronological and author/recipient index to these papers.

Logan, William E. (William Edmond), Sir, 1798-1875

Thomas Sterry Hunt Fonds

  • CA MUA MG2045
  • Fonds
  • 1845-1891

The bulk of the Hunt papers consists of scientific correspondence, with a fairly large component of notes on scientific subjects. Most of the material dates from after Hunt's departure for the United States. With the exception of a letter of appointment to the Geological Survey of Vermont in 1845, all Hunt's correspondence (incoming, with copies of some outgoing) dates from the period 1863-1891, with the majority of items from the 1880s. There are a few letters of a social or personal nature, but most concern scientific matters: geological and chemical research problems, exchange of specimens, Hunt's theories and the controversies they stirred, his publications, negotiations for patents on some of his discoveries, the business of various scientific societies, and in particular the organization of the Geological Congress. Amongst his correspondents were James D. Dana (with whom he engaged in a heated quarrel over scientific theory), James Hall, Persifor Frazer, J.W. Dawson, and various members of the Geological Survey of Canada, such as G.M. Dawson, Robert Bell, Henry Y. Hind, and George Iles. Hunt's scientific notes mostly deal with special topics in chemistry, geology, mineralogy, railways, coal products and the controversy with Dana. There are also reading notes for geological texts, lecture notes for courses in geology, 1876, and chemistry, and indexes, apparently for Hunt's books. A manuscript on "Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography: an episode in its history", notes for a lecture on "People I have met", and sketches of family history represent Hunt's wider interests. There are also clippings of reviews of books and lectures by Hunt, biographical notices, reports on scientific themes and institutions, and news of the Geological Survey.

Hunt, Thomas Sterry, 1826-1892

Casey Albert Wood Collection

  • CA RBD MSG 1203
  • Collection
  • approximately 1850-1981, predominant 1913-1940

This collection consists of materials dated from approximately 1850-1981, but predominantly from 1913-1940, relating to Dr. Casey Albert Wood’s research, writing, correspondence, and personal interest concerning ornithology, vertebrate zoology, memoir and family history, Emma Shearer Wood and Blacker Library collection development, ophthalmology, politics, and current events. Materials relate chiefly to Wood’s “Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Zoology” (1921-1956), falconry (1930s), his unpublished memoir (1930s), the development of McGill University’s Emma Shearer Wood and Blacker Libraries (1918-1941), the history of ophthalmology (1925-1936), “Fundus Oculi” (1911-1934), his travels and research expeditions studying birds in their natural habitat (1920-1940), political interests, and correspondence relating to these activities and subjects.

There are approximately 2902 incoming and outgoing pieces of correspondence including letters, postcards, notes, telegrams, and cards. Series 1) Research and writing, contains the largest volume of correspondence relating to “the Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Zoology.” While Series 2) Research trips, contains the largest portion of photographs. Other materials in this collection include research notes, manuscripts, page and galley proofs, book and article reprint publications, postcards, artwork, glass plate negatives, book plates, palm leaf manuscripts, artefacts, printed ephemera, clippings, journals, and administration and financial records relating to Wood’s publications or the Emma Shearer Wood and Blacker Libraries.

There are gaps within this collection relating to geographic locations, as not all locations Wood is known to have visited are represented or are only minimally represented. Asian countries, such as China or Japan, are not represented in this collection. While geographic locations that are prominent within the collection are Fiji, Sri Lanka and India.

The series consists of 1) research and writing (ca. 1850-1956); 2) research trips (1920-1937); 3) scrapbooks (1887-1946); 4) collection development (1918-1941); 5) published books (1907-1981); 6) artefacts (191-?, 1920-1937); and 7) glass negative plates (1924, 1927, 1930, 1956).

Wood, Casey A. (Casey Albert), 1856-1942

Some recollections of a long life.

This subseries focuses on the unpublished memoir of Casey A. Wood, which consists of manuscripts, typescripts, notes, research project notes and publications, correspondence (1888-1939), photographs, clippings and printed material, and journals (1891, 1930-1931) from approximately 1850-1939. Wood had assistance from family members, professional connections, and friends to compile his biographical information for the memoir. Wood was living in Rome during the mid- to late-1930s, so much of the Canadian research was conducted by family members Samuel Casey Wood III, Alan Wood, and Edith Hayes. There is correspondence between Wood and his family on the progress of the memoir, their family, and personal lives. The subseries consists of approximately 110 letters and 1 telegram with additional correspondence, clippings, and other materials integrated into the memoir’s manuscript and typescripts.
Individuals addressed within the correspondence and other materials include Alan Wood, Samuel Casey Wood III, George Iles, H. Clay Evans, Dr. George H. Mathewson, Francis J. Shepherd, Harvey Cushing, Dr. George H. Simmons, Casey Hayes, Josephine Seymour, Dr. Charles P. Small, Ms. Slaughter, Major J. C. Dawson, Dr. J. C. Simpson, J. R. Slonaker, Irving S. Cutter, Dr. H. D. Birkett, Dr. Franck Brawley, Dr. Maude Abbott, Elizabeth E. Abbott, Dr. W. W. Francis, Harry Harris, G. R. Lomer, Dr. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, Dr. C. F. Wylde, V. C. Wynne Edwards, Dr. Andreas Nell, Sir William Osler, C. F. Wylde, Frank Allport, and Norma Shearer.
Throughout the subseries common topics include providing information for the memoir, travel, careers, education, Italy during the late 1930s, politics, ornithology, zoology, donations of materials by Casey Wood, family, Emperor Frederick II and “the Art of Falconry,” Emma Shearer Wood and Blacker Library collections, aviculture, John III, the Feather book, animal protection, history of medicine, “Coloured Plates of the Birds of Ceylon,” Ali ibn Isa, and Wood’s research, career, and health.
The printed material includes a variety of leaflets, brochures, cards, invitations, tickets, bookplates, booklets, clippings etc. from or about various current events, travel experiences, publications, etc.. Within the subseries' photographs are images of Dr. Thomas Woodruff, Emma Shearer Wood, Casey Wood, Marjorie Fyfe, James Shearer, Eliza Shearer, Dr. Richmond, Dr. Ridgway, other family members and friends, and from research trips. Places related to Wood’s life mentioned in this subseries include the United States, Canada, Germany, Sri Lanka, England, Italy, Ethiopia, Vienna, France, Afghanistan, British Guiana, Australia, Fiji, McGill and Emma Shearer Wood Libraries, Bishops’ College, Western General Hospital, Stanford University, and the Chicago Ophthalmological Society.

Research and writing

This series consists of research, writing, and correspondence files relating to Casey Wood's major and minor publications and unpublished works, as well as, others assisting in Wood's publications, research, or writing about Wood. The majority of the research and writing materials for Wood's published and unpublished works were created between 1920-1940, while other materials collected during Wood's life, those associated with his memoir and obituary, date from approximately 1850-1943.
Some prominent writings by Wood include “Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Zoology” (1921-1956), his unpublished memoir (ca. 1850-1939), “Fundus Oculi” (1911-1934), Wood family history (1920-1940), “Birds of Fiji” (1920-1928), “Through Forest and Jungle in Kashmir and North India” (1921-1934); Persian, Arabic and Hindustani manuscripts (1927-1934); and “The Art of Falconry” (1942).
The series consists of many volumes and files containing a number of record types including manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, publications, photographs, correspondence, clippings, printed material, postcards, journals, administrative and financial records, and artwork. Some of the volumes are scrapbooks containing many of these materials mounted within, while others include similar materials bound within. These volumes do not necessarily have a clear organization but are sometimes arranged chronologically or by correspondent.

There are 2230 incoming and outgoing pieces of correspondence including letters, postcards, notes, telegrams, and cards. Subseries 1) Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Zoology includes 1313 pieces of correspondence, the largest number of correspondence within the collection.

Other research and writing projects for publication.

This subseries consists of many of Wood's major publications in various iterations such as manuscripts, typescripts, page proofs, and galley proofs. Additionally, this subseries contains other manuscripts, research notes, photographs, prints or illustrations, correspondence, book reviews, and other materials relating directly to Wood's research projects and publications. The material is dated from 1904-1942 but focuses predominantly from 1913- 1934. Much of the subseries is composed of bound volumes, some of which contain multiple record types, either bound or mounted within the volumes.
The research and writing projects focus on the following topics and geographic regions: ornithology, Fundus Oculi (1911-1934), Wood’s family history (1920-1940), South America (1920-1921), Fiji and Fiji Islands (1920-1931), fossil eggs (1923-1925), flowers and meadows in Switzerland (1924-1934), “An Introduction to the Literature of Vertebrate Zoology,” aviculture (1925-1928), New Zealand, medieval Persian manuscripts (1927-1934), Benevenutus Grassus’ de Oculis (1930), John III, Kashmir and North India (1921-1934), Ceylon (1925, 1928, 1934), "the Art of Falconry" (1938?-1942), and Ali ibn Isa (1935-1936).
Other contributors to some publications and manuscripts include Marjorie Fyfe, Alexander Wetmore, Wladimir Ivanow, Arthur William Head, Dr. Andreas Nell, W. J. Belcher, William C. Morgan, and Marion C. Tallmon.
This subseries also contains 145 incoming and outgoing pieces of correspondence including letters and notes. Some individuals addressed include Arthur William Head, Christopher Leggo, Lillian Bates, Elizabeth E. Abbott, Cora Raymond, Dr. Richmond, W. J. Belcher, C. S. Walis, Theodore Hamblin Ltd., James R. Slonaker, and R. R. Donnelley and Sons Co.. This subseries also includes photographs of Wood’s family, professional colleagues and friends, and research and publications.

Katsuji Nakashima Fonds

  • CA MUA MG 4305
  • Fonds
  • approximately 1909-1945

The collection documents the life of Katsuji Nakashima since his arrival in Canada in 1909. The material consists of a personal handwritten journal written on rice paper in ancient Japanese; a Dominion of Canada certificate of Naturalization issued in 1919; a passport issued by the Imperial Japanese Government (1921); invitations, bills and other ephemeral items (ca. 1910-1945); military photographs; an Internment Camp Ration Book; and other personal documents reflecting the civilian and military activities of Katsuji Nakashima. The collection also contains personal belongings such as Buddhist prayer items.

Nakashima, Katsuji

Published books

This series consists of 30 bound volumes either published by Casey A. Wood, used for reference during his research and writing projects, or published on his professional career and publications. The volumes are dated from 1907-1981, with predominant dates from 1923-1936. Wood's publications focus on his international work in ornithology between 1915-1936 and were published in prominent ornithological journals such as the Smithsonian Report, Auk, Ibis, Bird-Lore, Condor Magazine, McGill Publications, etc.

Two volumes contain a number of Wood’s published books and one also includes newspaper clippings related to Fiji, Ceylon, Sinhalese coins, and McGill Library collection materials. One volume of "A Collection of Birds from the Fiji Islands" includes presentations notes from W. J. Belcher on birds from Fiji dated December 14, 1936.

The files used for Wood’s research dated from 1907-1937 include publications on Emperor Frederick II and falconry, English-Italian dictionaries, and ornithology library catalogues. This series also contains the 1981 Casey Wood Bio-bibliography compiled by E. C. Astbury. Not all of Wood’s publications are present within this series, however various iterations of the manuscripts or parts of manuscripts not represented within this series may be present in other series.

Individual cataloguing records of volumes can be found in the McGill library catalogue.

Arthur William Currie Fonds

  • CA MUA MG 1030
  • Fonds
  • 1928-1933

Fonds consists of originals, carbon and photocopies stemming from both the wartime and post-war phases of Currie's career. His wartime career is recorded in a copy of his battlefield diary for 2 June 1916- 8 February 1917 and commemorated in an album of signatures of the officers he commanded. Postwar materials comprise correspondence and speeches. The correspondence concerns various causes which Currie patronized and books for which he wrote introductions. His speeches (in 7 volumes, with some loose) are devoted to the war and its aftermath, politics, education, eulogies, speeches of welcome, Christmas and New Year's messages, dedications of war memorials and the like. Some are noted as having been written by Wilfred Bovey.

Currie, Arthur, Sir, 1875-1933

McGill biographies and obituaries

This file contains biographical texts of figures associated with McGill, including "William Leslie Logie: McGill University's first graduate and Canada's first medical graduate" by Barbara R. Tunis and Edward H. Bensley (4 December 1971); "Alexis St. Martin" by Edward H. Bensley (May 1959); obituary for David Stewart Forster by S.M. Banfill (ca. 1959).

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