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Authority record

Adams, William, 1807-1880

  • no 93032359
  • Person
  • 1807-1880

Rev. William Adams was born on January 25, 1807, in Colchester, Connecticut.

In 1830, he graduated from the Theological Seminary in Andover, Massachusetts. He served as the pastor of the Congregational Church in Brighton, Massachusetts (1831-1834), the Central Presbyterian Church (1834-1853) which moved into a new building and became the Madison Square Presbyterian Church (1853-1874) in New York City. He was a founder as well as the first president of the Union Theological Seminary (1874) in New York City. He was also its professor of Sacred Rhetoric until his death in 1880.

In 1831, he married Susan Patton Magoun (d. 1834). In 1836, he remarried her sister Martha Bradshaw Magoun. He died on August 31, 1880, in Orange Mountain, New Jersey.

Adamson, Samuel A. (Samuel Arthur), 1845-1890

  • Person
  • 1845-1890

Samuel Arthur Adamson was born on June 18, 1845, in Holbeck, Yorkshire, England.

He was a well-known and widely esteemed geologist of the Midlands, who provided good service to the cause of science by spreading interest in the progress of geology. He took an active part in the affairs of the local scientific societies becoming the Local Secretary of the Yorkshire Geological Society for the Leeds district. In 1877, he became a Fellow of the Geological Society. He especially devoted his attention to the Carboniferous rocks and the Drift phenomena of his own neighbourhood and published many articles in various geological journals.

In 1871, he married Mary Ann Summersgill. He died in January 1890, in Leeds, Yorkshire West Riding, England.

Addinsell, Richard, 1904-1977

  • n 82153087
  • Person
  • 1904-1977

English composer Richard Addinsell is best known for his romantic “Warsaw Concerto,” used in the soundtrack for the now mostly forgotten film “Dangerous Moonlight.” Home-schooled, he studied law in Oxford at Herford College but abandoned the legal field after only 18 months; he enrolled in 1925 at the Royal College of Music but quit after two terms. He began collaborating with various producers of theatrical musical revues, including Noel Gray and Clemence Dane. He spent 1929 touring European musical centers, particularly Berlin and Vienna. In 1932, Eva Le Gallienne asked him to create the incidental music for her Broadway adaptation of "Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass." His real talent, however, seems to have been composing for film. Between 1932 and 1965, he composed music for more than 40 films, many of them well known. Even though “Dangerous Moonlight” (released in North America as “Suicide Squadron”) was not a great success, his Rachmaninov-inspired “Warsaw Concerto” that characterized the score has been recorded more than a hundred times and sold over three million copies. In 1942, he collaborated with Joyce Grenfell and with Laurier Lister for some West End revues. In the 1960s he withdrew from his group of friends and retired from public life. His last years were spent with his good friend Victor Stiebel, comforting him during the difficult decline due to multiple sclerosis. Stiebel died in 1976 and Addinsell a year later.

Addrisi, Dick

  • no2011151607
  • Person
  • 1941-

Richard P. Addrisi was one half of the American pop duo, the Addrisi Brothers. The brothers were born in Winthrop, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, to a couple from Europe known as the “Flying Addrisis,” an acrobatic trapeze act. Although they sometimes claimed to have been part of the act as youngsters, Dick has later said that his father was a businessman. It soon became apparent that the brothers had musical talents, and encouraged by comedian Lenny Bruce, who heard them perform, the family headed west in 1954, performing along the way for various fraternal organizations. Bruce helped them find an agent who lured them to Calfornia in 1956 with the possibility of an audition for mouseketeers on the Mickey Mouse Club RV show. That fell through, but the family stayed on and in 1957 Richard started going to the Hollywood Professional School. The next year they performed in Las Vegas and claimed to be the youngest act ever to work there. They recorded for Del-Phi Records, then Imperial Records and Warner Brothers Records. After it became clear they were not cut out for singing careers, they switched to song-writing and had a few hits among some 22 singles. Their greatest success was “Never My Love,” a gentle ballad written in 1967 for The Association; in 2011, this song was named the second most performed song ever, according to a tabulation by the performing rights organization BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.) In the 1970s they composed music for television, including the theme for the television show “Nanny and the Professor.” The brothers’ careers as a duo ended in 1984 when Don died of pancreatic cancer. Dick later moved to Argentina.

Addrisi, Don

  • n 2007071371
  • Person
  • 1938-1984

Donald J. Addrisi was one half of the American pop duo, the Addrisi Brothers. The brothers were born in Winthrop, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, to a couple from Europe known as the “Flying Addrisis,” an acrobatic trapeze act. Although they sometimes claimed to have been part of the act as youngsters, Dick has later said that his father was a businessman. It soon became apparent that the brothers had musical talents, and encouraged by comedian Lenny Bruce, who heard them perform, the family headed west in 1954, performing along the way for various fraternal organizations. Bruce helped them find an agent who lured them to Calfornia in 1956 with the possibility of an audition for mouseketeers on the Mickey Mouse Club RV show. That fell through, but the family stayed on and in 1957 Richard started going to the Hollywood Professional School. The next year they performed in Las Vegas and claimed to be the youngest act ever to work there. They recorded for Del-Phi Records, then Imperial Records and Warner Brothers Records. After it became clear they were not cut out for singing careers, they switched to song-writing and had a few hits among some 22 singles. Their greatest success was “Never My Love,” a gentle ballad written in 1967 for The Association; in 2011, this song was named the second most performed song ever, according to a tabulation by the performing rights organization BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.) In the 1970s they composed music for television, including the theme for the television show “Nanny and the Professor.” The brothers’ careers as a duo ended in 1984 when Don died of pancreatic cancer. Dick later moved to Argentina.

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